Veterans should get more help from FCC's Lifeline Program

The Lifeline program making cellphones and broadband service available to an estimated 1.3 million low-income US veterans is a vital service, but one that needs to be expanded to help more vets, according to a filing made at the Federal Communications Commission by Constance A. Burns, president and CEO, National Association of American Veterans (NAAV), the company said.

The filing with the FCC comes as the Commission is considering changes — including a restrictive budget cap, higher minimum standards that would shrink available service, and limitations on the enrollment through the National Verifier System for Lifeline — that could end up seeing many or even most vets being forced out of the program.

The mission of the National Association of American Veterans (NAAV) is to assist service members and disabled veterans and their dependents, particularly severely wounded warriors and single-parent service members and veterans, by helping access their benefits, improving communication and coordination with VA, and collaborating with the VA and other veterans groups, health agencies, medical professional organizations, educational organizations, and the public in support of veterans, their families, and military caregivers.

For more information go to www.naavets.org.