Switchblade creates international demand for flying car



Samson Sky, creators of the Switchblade, the world´s first Flying Sports Car, now has Pre-flight Owners and Reservation Holders hailing from 15 countries worldwide, and 40 states of the US, the company said.

The numbers are growing daily, averaging five new reservations each week, according to Samson Reservations Manager, Martha Bousfield. The engineering and build team at Samson is working intently to finish assembly of their cutting-edge vehicle, with first flight scheduled just a few months away.

The Switchblade is classified as a motorcycle by the US Department of Transportation, but Sam Bousfield, its creator, likes to call it a flying sports car because of its high performance. Its engine is a turbo-charged, lightweight 190 hp liquid-cooled V4 that is capable of 0-60 in 6.5 seconds and a top speed of 125+ mph / 201+ kph. In the air it will cruise at 160 mph / 257 kph, with a top speed of up to 200 mph / 322 kph and a range of 450 miles / 724 km.

Using Road & Track´s slalom testing parameters, the ground test vehicle out-performed everything in its wheelbase per Road & Track´s historical data base.

In 2009, NASA Aerospace Engineer Larry Neu was the first person in the world to secure a Switchblade. Now retired, he still captains a Gulfstream. “Having seen various parts of the world from a high cruising altitude, the Switchblade will allow me to take my viewing of the scenery of this beautiful country to low altitudes. When I spot something that piques my interest, I´ll hit the ´nearest airport´ button on my GPS, land, and revert to ground mode. What a way to travel and explore. I see the Switchblade as the ultimate freedom machine.”

With flying car involvement from Google, Amazon, Uber and others, interest is building and it´s to growing public attention and enormous investment activity. Apparently even new jobs are being created, as Silicon Valley-based online school Udacity has launched a flying car degree program to begin training flying car engineers.