Purdue University studies environmental impact of space-based ADS-B

Purdue University´s School of Aeronautics and Astronautics has released findings of a report that analyzes the potential impact of space-based automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology on global aviation carbon emissions in remote and oceanic airspace, the school said.

The research, authored by Dr. Karen Marais, is titled Environmental Benefits of Space-based ADS-B, indicates that the implementation of this technology can offer benefits preventing approximately 14.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) from being released into the atmosphere between 2020 and 2030.

According to 2015 estimates from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), commercial aviation contributes about two percent of global manmade CO2 emissions annually.

Aireon LLC is deploying a global, space-based air traffic surveillance system for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) equipped aircraft over the entire globe. Aireon will provide real-time ADS-B surveillance to oceanic, polar and remote regions, as well as augment existing ground-based systems that are limited to terrestrial airspace.

Aireon´s space-based ADS-B service is expected to be operational in 2018, shortly after the completion of the Iridium NEXT satellite constellation. The constellation will consist of 66 operational low-earth-orbit satellites providing 100 percent global coverage. The service will also provide air navigation service providers (ANSPs) with global aircraft surveillance capability, and is expected to help reduce fuel costs, increase safety and enable more efficient flight paths.