Passenger screening becoming invisible

Automation and pre-processing are reducing the physical interaction with travelers during airport passenger screening, according to an analysis by Frost & Sullian.

This is the first step toward a future in which the passenger screening process will become unintrusive. An assortment of portal scanners, biometric collection devices, and pre-clearance based on voluntary background investigations will transform the passenger screening process.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Global Airport Passenger Screening Market, finds while the threat of terrorism continues to be the most influential market driver; efficient checkpoint processing is in high demand by airports to reduce traveler wait times. As a result, the global spending on passenger screening technologies, which stood at USD1.42 billion in 2014, expects to reach USD1.63 billion in 2020.

According to a recent passenger forecast released by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the number of global annual airline passengers will reach 7.3 billion by 2034, more than double from the 3.3 billion reported in 2014.

“Airports already employ automated systems such as automated passport control kiosks and automated border control, eGates, for international travel,” observed Hernandez. “The next step is to transition automated passenger screening to airport checkpoints. Equipment maintenance and recurring training will be critical selling points to agencies responsible for procurement.”