NASA crew returns to Earth after 197-day Expedition 57 mission

NASA has announced the Expedition 57 crew members, including NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, have returned to Earth following the 197-day mission from the International Space Station, the company said.

The spacecraft touched down in Kazakhstan, marking the end of a voyage that took them around the globe 3,152 times, covering 83.3 million miles.

The Expedition 57 crew contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science aboard the world-class orbiting laboratory. Highlights included investigations into new cancer treatment methods and algae growth in space. The crew also installed a new Life Sciences Glovebox, a sealed work area for life science and technology investigations that can accommodate two astronauts.

For more than 18 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 230 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,400 research investigations from researchers in more than 103 countries.

NASA crew returns to Earth after 197-day Expedition 57 mission

NASA has announced the Expedition 57 crew members, including NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, have returned to Earth following the 197-day mission from the International Space Station, the company said.

The spacecraft touched down in Kazakhstan, marking the end of a voyage that took them around the globe 3,152 times, covering 83.3 million miles.

The Expedition 57 crew contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science aboard the world-class orbiting laboratory. Highlights included investigations into new cancer treatment methods and algae growth in space. The crew also installed a new Life Sciences Glovebox, a sealed work area for life science and technology investigations that can accommodate two astronauts.

For more than 18 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 230 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,400 research investigations from researchers in more than 103 countries.