AFGE urges TSA to reconsider proposal to eliminate passenger screening at 150 airports

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has announced it is considering a proposal to eliminate passenger security screening at more than 150 small and medium-sized airports across the country–a move the employees´ union says could have grave consequences, the administration said.

According to reports, TSA claims the move could save USD 115 million annually, but the plan has little regard for the safety of the flying public. The American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE), which represents more than 43,000 TSA officers nationwide, says saving money should be the least of the agency´s concern.

The union representing Transportation Security Administration officers says a TSA proposal to eliminate passenger security screening at more than 150 small and medium-sized airports across the country would unravel years of security procedures put in place after 9/11.
The union representing Transportation Security Administration officers says a TSA proposal to eliminate passenger security screening at more than 150 small and medium-sized airports across the country would unravel years of security procedures put in place after 9/11.

Last year, TSA officers confiscated a record number of 3,957 firearms at checkpoints nationwide–84 percent of them loaded. TSA officers screen 2 million passengers, 1.3 million checked items, and 4.9 million carry-on bags every day.

AFGE urges TSA to reject any proposal to eliminate screening functions at airports and make aviation safety a budgetary priority.

The American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) is the largest federal employee union, representing 700,000 workers in the federal government and the government of the District of Columbia.